Kimchi pancakes and kimchi style romaine


I love kimchi pancakes in all their forms: mung flour based, rice flour based, regular wheat flour based (although I just found out that my body has decided not to be friends with gluten anymore). These were made with regular flour, eggs, chopped kimchi, chopped green onions and kimchi “juice.”

For this post, I’d like to focus on the salad – a kimchi style romaine with shaved radishes. The dressing is the exciting part, and I love the tang, spice and salt.

  • 1 teaspoon chopped garlic
  • 1/2 teaspoon grated peeled ginger
  • 1/2 teaspoon coarse Korean hot red-pepper flakes
  • 1 tablespoon Asian sesame oil
  • 2 tablespoons soy sauce or tamari
  • 2 tablespoons black vinegar or rice vinegar
  • 1 teaspoon toasted sesame seeds

Combine these ingredients and toss with the chopped romaine and shaved radishes. This salad actually tastes even better as it marinates and wilts a bit.


South Indian-inspired lentil stew with coconut-rice crepes

Lentil soup with coconut rice crepe

This stew is inspired by some of my favorite breakfasts while in Goa. I didn’t follow a recipe, but I’ll try to capture how I ended up with the step. The crepes are an easy recipe that I’ll include below. I think they’d also be delicious with some butter and honey drizzled for breakfast or dessert!

Lentil Stew

Saute a chopped onion, 3 carrots, a tablespoon each of grated ginger and turmeric and 5 cloves of garlic until golden brown. Add a teaspoon each of black mustard seeds, cumin seeds, and your favorite curry powder or masala. Add one bunch of chopped kale, 1/2 lb of split red lentils and enough veggie broth to cover everything. Let this simmer for 30 minutes, stirring occasionally. Season with salt to taste. Once the lentils are soft, use an immersion blender to puree about half the soup and stir together until you get a consistency that you like. I prefer leaving in some of the chunks, but you might prefer a smoother soup. Adjust the spice levels to taste and add lemon juice for some brightness.

Coconut Rice Crepes

  • 1 cup rice
  • 1/2 cup water
  • 1/2 cup coconut milk
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt

Soak one cup of white rice (I used a mixture of basmati and sushi rice) in water overnight. Drain and place in a blender with 1/2 cup of fresh water and 1/2 cup coconut milk. Add 1/2 teaspoon salt and blend until completely smooth. The batter will be very runny, maybe the thickness of cream? That is how it should be, don’t worry!

Heat a nonstick pan on high with some oil until just smoking. Add about 1/2 cup of batter to the pan and tilt to coat the pan thinly. Cook until light brown and then flip and cook until light brown on the other side.

Serve the stew with a garnish of chopped cilantro and a few rice crepes for dipping.

Poached eggs, kale-lemon salad, buttery toast


Easy dinner –

Step 1: Put a shallow pan of water on to simmer (for the eggs). Add a dash of vinegar and salt.

Step 2: Wash, stem and roughly chop one bunch of kale. Massage in a bowl with the juice of a lemon, salt, pepper and a drizzle of olive oil.

Step 3: Melt lots of butter in a big pan. Toast bread in the melted butter until golden on both sides.

Step 5: Crack eggs into a heatproof saucer and slip into the simmering water, one at a time. Poach for about 5 minutes for a medium-soft yolk.

Step 6: Stack the salad in a large bowl with toast on the bottom, topped with kale salad, crumbled feta and a poached egg. Season with salt and pepper.

Coffee-molasses glazed pork chops


This Alton Brown inspired glaze is so easy and versatile, you’ll want to keep it in your regular rotation. I used it on chicken thighs and pork chops, but I think that it would be great on roasted veggies, tofu, salmon and most other meats. I served it with a carrot-yam puree and seared broccoli.

  • 1 cup strong brewed coffee (I actually just dumped in fine ground coffee, about 1/2 cup, and some warm water. Worked well!)
  • 1/2 cup dark molasses
  • 3 tablespoons dijon mustard
  • 1 tablespoon chili flakes
  • 1 tablespoon apple cider vinegar
  • 1 clove minced garlic
  • salt and pepper to taste

Marinate the protein in the a zip-top bag for 2-3 hours and then grill to desired doneness (3-4 minutes/side for pork chops). Strain the marinade into a small saucepan and reduce until syrupy. Drizzle a little glaze over each serving. If using on roasted veggies, I would suggest reducing the marinade down and tossing with the veggies during the last 5 minutes of cooking.

French onion soup – warmth in a bowl

I will confess upfront that this soup was consumed so fast that I didn’t get a photo of the final plated (bowled?) dish. I served it with toasted sourdough croutons and melted Gruyere cheese, and I can assure you, it was tasty.

I made the stock from scratch, using meaty short ribs, dried maitake mushrooms, and a bunch of veggies.


Next, I slowly caramelized about 5 large sliced onions in lots of butter and 4-5 cloves of sliced garlic. I started them on the stove and then moved them to a 300 F oven, stirring them every 30 minutes until they were a dark brown.

I strained the broth, shredded the bits of meat and added those plus the broth into the pan of onions, scraping up all of the browned bits. I added a dash of Cognac and adjusted the salt and pepper. To serve, I topped individual bowls with toasted cubes of sourdough (I find cubes easier to eat than a whole toast) and shredded Gruyere, melted under the broiler.


Roasted spaghetti squash


It’s squash roasting season, obviously, but I wanted to make a specific plug for spaghetti squash. Cut it in half, scrape out the seeds, coat with olive oil and fill the halves with sliced garlic, herb sprigs and a sprinkle of salt.

Place, cut side down, on a baking sheet and bake at 350 for 25-30 minutes until the squash strands separate as you drag a fork across them. The texture should remain crisp, and it’s better to under-bake than over. If you really want to soften it, just throw it back in the oven for a few more minutes. An over-baked squash is just mushy and sad.

I like to toss the strands with toasted walnuts, red pepper flakes, black pepper and shards of parmesan or aged gouda. It’s also great coated with some fresh pesto.

Sometimes you just need nachos


With everything going on, sometimes you just need nachos. I am not saying that nachos fix anything, but they don’t hurt, that’s for sure. I’ll take all the comfort I can get, plus, I need fuel for getting back up to keep fighting.

These particular nachos included pinto beans, ground bison cooked with onions, garlic and my homemade spice mix (cumin, ghost chilis, chipotles, black pepper and coriander), cheddar cheese, pickled jalapenos, greek yogurt, cilantro and (jarred, *gasp!*) salsa. It was exactly what I needed. Also, please note that I do not endorse “scoop” shaped chips, but these were on sale. What can you do?

To make up for the fact that there is no recipe in this post, here is a photo of some chopped carrots that ended up looking like a heart! I was taking a picture of the knife to send to the gift-giver that gifted it to me, and I noticed the shape of the carrots afterwards.img_0308

Spicy lamb, cherry, smoked mozzarella flatbread

A memory of a spiced lamb flatbread in a Turkish restaurant in North Carolina inspired this version. I didn’t have enough tomatoes on hand for the lamb mixture, so I used cherries and cherry tomatoes. A winning combination.


I’ve already posted recipes for pizza crust here, so feel free to make your favorite kind. I’ll focus on the lamb topping here.

  • 1 lb ground lamb
  • 1 onion, diced small
  • 2 garlic cloves, minced
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1 teaspoon ras el hanout spice mix
  • 1 cup fresh cherries, pitted, quartered
  • 1/2 cup smoked mozzarella
  • 1/2 cup cherry tomatoes, halved

Brown the lamb, onion and garlic in a little olive oil over medium high heat. Add salt, ras el hanout and cherries and stir to combine. Taste and adjust seasoning as needed.

Roll out your dough to the size of a large cookie sheet and place on parchment paper on a sheet pan. Pack on the lamb topping so that it adheres in one layer. Distribute the cheese evenly and place in a 500 F oven for 15-20 minutes or until the bottom of the crust is crispy and golden. It should sound hollow when tapped.

Scatter the tomatoes over the top, slice and serve.


Magic quiche (crustless egg pie)

My mom used to make a betty crocker recipe called something like “impossible hamburger pie,” that consisted of bisquick, eggs, and some kind of filling and cheese. I had the idea to try the same recipe structure, using gluten-free biscuit mix instead. It is fantastic, and easy, and can be made with nearly any ingredients. Perfect go-to weeknight meal (plus leftovers were delish for lunch).


Magic Quiche

  • 1/2 cup gluten free biscuit mix (or regular mix)
  • 1 cup milk (regular or dairy free)
  • 2 eggs
  • 1 lb meat or meatless filling (I used garlic pork sausage. You could use mushrooms, veggie meat product, ground beef or lamb, etc)
  • 1 onion, chopped
  • 1 bunch kale, washed and chopped
  • 1 cup sharp cheddar or your favorite cheese

Whisk the biscuit mix, milk and egg together. Set aside.

Brown the meat or meatless filling in a large pan over medium high heat. Add the onion and stir to cook until transparent. Remove to a greased pie pan. Cook the kale in the same pan with a drizzle of olive oil and pinch of salt until wilted. Add to pie pan. I sprinkled in some chopped basil, just because I had some growing at the time. Green onions and other fresh herbs would be great as well.

Pour the egg mixture evenly over the fillings in the pie pan. Top with the shredded cheese and bake for 30-35 minutes in a 400 F oven or until a knife inserted into the center comes out clean. As with most gluten free baking, the cook time can be a bit longer. If you are using regular biscuit mix, cut the time by 5 minutes.

Arepas with eggs, salsa, and cilantro-jalapeño crema

Fresh arepas are closer at hand than you might think, and an impressive addition to the classic brunch combo of eggs and salsa.


  • 1 lb masa harina (fine corn flour), about 4 cups
  • 1 tablespoon salt
  • 2 tablespoons fat (can be coconut oil, butter, lard, vegetable shortening)
  • 4 cups warm water

Mix masa, salt and fat together until combined, and then add the water, stirring to mix evenly. Let the dough rest, covered, for about 10 minutes. This allows the masa to hydrate, soaking up the water.

Portion the dough into about 8 equal balls and flatten to about 1/2 inch in thickness. Cook each arepa in a hot, oiled pan for 2 minutes on each side. This “seals” the arepa and ensures a crispy crust. Then put the arepas into the oven at 350 F for 10-15 minutes to finish cooking through. They are done when they sound hollow when tapped and are crispy on the outside.

You can slice these open to stuff with fillings, or top with eggs, salsa and crema, as I did. I’ll let y’all cook your eggs how you like and pick your favorite salsa recipe, but here is a simple recipe for the crema.

Cilantro jalapeño crema

  • 1 cup cilantro, washed and dried (can use leaves and stems too)
  • 1 jalapeño, stem removed
  • juice of one lime
  • 1 garlic clove, peeled
  • 1 cup sour cream or greek yogurt
  • salt and pepper to taste

Mix in blender until smooth and season to taste. This is great as a salad dressing or dip as well.